Thursday, July 31, 2014

Ivy League Ups and (Yes) Downs

Ivy League Ups and (Yes) Downs
By LAURA PAPPANO, NYTimes.com

Why the number of applications is rising, and falling.

Wednesday, July 30, 2014

What Makes a Positive College Experience?

What Makes a Positive College Experience?
By TAMAR LEWIN, NYTimes.com

After a decade of research, a sociologist believes he knows what determines how students feel about their time at college.

Tuesday, July 29, 2014

The Fading Honor Code

The Fading Honor Code
By JESSICA CHEUNG, NYTimes.com

If students fail to report cheaters, can a culture of integrity prevail?

Monday, July 28, 2014

10 Courses With a Twist

10 Courses With a Twist

Professors are capitalizing on what computers can’t do — like take walks, serve pizza, chase tornadoes and teach through experience.

Sunday, July 27, 2014

How playing an instrument benefits your brain - Anita Collins



TED-ED: How playing an instrument benefits your brain - Anita Collins

View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/how-playing

When you listen to music, multiple areas of your brain become engaged and active. But when you actually play an instrument, that activity becomes more like a full-body brain workout. What's going on? Anita Collins explains the fireworks that go off in musicians' brains when they play, and examines some of the long-term positive effects of this mental workout.

Lesson by Anita Collins, animation by Sharon Colman Graham.

Saturday, July 26, 2014

Steven Pinker’s Mind Games

Steven Pinker’s Mind Games
NYTimes.com

The Harvard professor culled exam questions from his course “Psychological Science.” Test your knowledge.

Friday, July 25, 2014

Tuition financial aid on the way for middle-class California families

Tuition financial aid on the way for middle-class California families
Larry Gordon, LATimes.com

Some financial relief is in sight for thousands of middle-class students at California's public universities, under a new and unusual state program that will provide aid to families that earn up to $150,000 annually.

Thursday, July 24, 2014

Learning to Think Outside the Box

Learning to Think Outside the Box

Once considered the product of genius or divine inspiration, creativity — the ability to spot problems and devise smart solutions — is being recast as a teachable skill.

Wednesday, July 23, 2014

Percentage of out-of-state UC students to rise again

Percentage of out-of-state UC students to rise again
Larry Gordon, LATimes.com

The number of new UC students from other states and nations will continue to increase this fall, extending a trend that university officials say is financially necessary but critics say is changing the nature of a beloved state institution.

Tuesday, July 22, 2014

Principals in U.S. Are More Likely to Consider Their Students Poor

Principals in U.S. Are More Likely to Consider Their Students Poor
By DAVID LEONHARDT, NYTimes.com

Perceptions of disadvantage may play role as American students from low-income families struggle more than counterparts in many other nations.

Monday, July 21, 2014

More on American Colleges’ Standing in the World

More on American Colleges’ Standing in the World
By KEVIN CAREY, NYTimes.com

Defenders of the supremacy of United States universities are using arguments that don't stand up to scrutiny.

Sunday, July 20, 2014

Film Explores Crushing Cost of US College Education



VOAVideo: Film Explores Crushing Cost of US College Education

Twenty years ago, many American families were able to navigate financially through the uncharted waters of paying for a college education. But since then, college expenses have risen exponentially, drowning many students in debt, which is the subject of Andrew Rossi's documentary "Ivory Tower". More from VOA's Penelope Poulou.

Saturday, July 19, 2014

Appeals Panel Upholds Race in Admissions for University

Appeals Panel Upholds Race in Admissions for University
By TAMAR LEWIN, NYTimes.com

A panel of the United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit on Tuesday said the University of Texas at Austin used race narrowly enough to meet the standard laid out by the Supreme Court.

Friday, July 18, 2014

Asian-Americans and SCA-5: Here's why many oppose it

Asian-Americans and SCA-5: Here's why many oppose it
By Michael Wang Special to the MercuryNews.com

For high school students aiming to attend a top college, July is filled with exam prep, community service, lab work, internships, music and athletic camps. With Stanford taking only 5.1 percent of applicants and Yale just 7.1 percent, the odds are so uncertain that no effort is spared to build a competitive profile.

Applying to college is an anxiety-filled rite-of-passage for students and parents alike. For Asian-American families, however, the anxiety is mixed with dread. They know that their race will be used against them in admissions, and there is nothing they can do but over prepare. (read more)

Friday, July 4, 2014

An Education Reporter Puts Himself To The (Standardized) Test

An Education Reporter Puts Himself To The (Standardized) Test
by CORY TURNER

What are the two most feared — most reviled — words in the English language?

"Tax day," maybe? Or "traffic jam"?

"Pink slip" still connotes an awful brand of helplessness, even though, I assume, most Americans who get pink-slipped these days never see a pink slip.

No, my vote is for "standardized test." (read more; listen to audio)

Thursday, July 3, 2014

Free College For All: Dream, Promise Or Fantasy?

Free College For All: Dream, Promise Or Fantasy?
by ANYA KAMENETZ, NPR.org

"Free" is a word with a powerful appeal. And right now it's being tossed around a lot, followed by another word: "college."

Wednesday, July 2, 2014

A Closer Look at Simplifying Financial Aid Applications

A Closer Look at Simplifying Financial Aid Applications

Concerns that ignoring assets would result in families with low income but high wealth getting aid are valid, but it is the lesser of two evils.

Tuesday, July 1, 2014

Americans Think We Have the World’s Best Colleges. We Don’t.

Americans Think We Have the World’s Best Colleges. We Don’t.
By KEVIN CAREY, NYTimes.com

The United States may have many of the best elite colleges, but over all, our higher-education system has many of the same problems found in K-12.