Thursday, February 28, 2013

How to Fill Out the FAFSA



How to Fill Out the FAFSA

The Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) allows students to apply for more than $150 billion in grants, loans, and work-study funds. Check out this video for info about the FAFSA and the resources available to help fill out this important application. Visit StudentAid.gov/fafsa to learn more.

Federal Student Aid/FAFSA.gov on YouTube

Wednesday, February 27, 2013

TED Radio Hour: Building A Better Classroom

TED Radio Hour: Building A Better Classroom
"There's a terrible tendency to confuse raising standards with standardizing." — Sir Ken Robinson

We know getting a good education is important, but does the current model nurture real learning? Here, we look at powerful ideas on how to change education: flipping classrooms, rethinking lesson plans and re-imagining the role of teacher and student.

Sir Ken Robinson: How Do Schools Suffocate Creativity?

Salman Khan: How Can Videos "Flip The Classroom?"

John Hunter: How Can 4th Graders Solve World Problems?

Tuesday, February 26, 2013

Web Classes Grapple With Stopping Cheats

WSJ: Web Classes Grapple With Stopping Cheats

Traditional colleges and a new breed of online-education providers are pouring resources into efforts to solve a problem that has bedeviled teachers for centuries.

Monday, February 25, 2013

Big MOOC Moves Closer to Academic Acceptance

WSJ: Big MOOC Moves Closer to Academic Acceptance

Online-education provider Coursera is one step closer to academic acceptance, saying Thursday that the American Council on Education would recommend colleges grant credit for the successful completion of some of its free classes.

Sunday, February 24, 2013

Teenager Wins Top Science Prize for Pancreatic Cancer Test



VOAVideo: Teenager Wins Top Science Prize for Pancreatic Cancer Test

Pancreatic cancer is one of the deadliest forms of cancer. Last year more than a quarter of a million people worldwide died from the disease, and that number is rising. But recently, a 16-year-old Maryland student created a simple test that can detect pancreatic cancer at its earliest stage of development -- a breakthrough that promises more effective diagnosis and treatment. The gifted young scientist, who was an invited guest of First Lady Michelle Obama at the President's State of the Union address Tuesday, is getting his career off to a roaring start. VOA's Julie Taboh has this profile.

Saturday, February 23, 2013

A Degree Drawn in Red Ink

A Degree Drawn in Red Ink

Most people assume a degree in the arts is no guarantee of riches. Now there is evidence that such graduates also rack up the most student-loan debt.

Friday, February 22, 2013

Ray Kurzweil: Your Brain in the Cloud



BigThink: Ray Kurzweil: Your Brain in the Cloud

According to futurist Ray Kurzweil, we are going to create synthetic neocortexes in order to extend the power of our own neocortex.

Transcript -- Sometimes people think that emotion and art are sort of sideshows to human intelligence and the real essence of intelligence is thinking logically. (read more)

Thursday, February 21, 2013

Why Can Some Kids Handle Pressure While Others Fall Apart?

Why Can Some Kids Handle Pressure While Others Fall Apart? By PO BRONSON and ASHLEY MERRYMAN, NYTimes

Scientists think bouts of panic in stressful situations can be traced to genetics. But don’t freak out. Biology is not necessarily destiny.

Wednesday, February 20, 2013

College Tips for Juniors From an Ivy League Dean

Visit NBCNews.com for breaking news, world news, and news about the economy

College Tips for Juniors From an Ivy League Dean By TANYA ABRAMS, NYTimes

Our Counselor’s Calendar tells us that now is the time for juniors to begin their college search in earnest. So it was very timely to see that Eric Furda, the dean of admissions at the University of Pennsylvania, appeared on NBC’s “Today” show on Wednesday to share admissions tips with college-bound students and their families. Watch the full interview below.

Tuesday, February 19, 2013

In China, Families Bet It All on College for Their Children

In China, Families Bet It All on College for Their Children By KEITH BRADSHER, NYTimes

Millions of Chinese sacrifice heavily for their children’s education, but as graduates saturate the job market, the security they seek is increasingly elusive.
Slide Show: A Difficult Path for an Education

The Education Revolution: A NYTimes series on the promises and challenges that China faces as it educates its citizens more broadly

Monday, February 18, 2013

Student Presidents

“We both have degrees from Harvard,” President Obama told the White House correspondents at this year’s annual roast. “I have one, he has two.” Pause. “What a snob.” Perhaps. With Mr. Obama (law) or Mitt Romney (law and business) in the White House, every president from 1989 to at least 2017 will have had a degree from Harvard or Yale. But the presidency has not always been elitist: 11 presidents never graduated college, and in the early years many had only a few years of formal schooling. We turned to the University of Virginia’s Miller Center, whose mission is to expand understanding of the presidency, for a history lesson. ANDREA KAYDA, NYTimes
See the answers»

Sunday, February 17, 2013

Court Documents from a Cheating Scandal

Court Documents from a Cheating Scandal by NYTimes

Federal prosecutors say a Memphis educator, Clarence D. Mumford Sr., paid teachers to take qualifying exams for other teachers in three states who were afraid they would not pass. Here, review the indictments and transcripts of the change of plea hearings.

Saturday, February 16, 2013

US College Students Recreate Bollywood's Best



US College Students Recreate Bollywood's Best

American audiences love Bollywood cinema. Seventy percent of foreign income for India's movie industry comes from North American theaters. On college campuses across America, competitive Bollywood dance teams hit the stage to perform campy Bollywood movie scenes for prizes and fame. Lonny Shavelson has this report for VOA.

Friday, February 15, 2013

H.P. Directs Its Suppliers in China to Limit Student

H.P. Directs Its Suppliers in China to Limit Student By KEITH BRADSHER and DAVID BARBOZA, NYTimes

New rules from Hewlett-Packard, one of the world’s largest makers of computers and other tech products, reflect a major shift in how electronics companies view Chinese labor practices.

Wednesday, February 13, 2013

Success of Immigrants’ Children Measured

Success of Immigrants’ Children Measured By SUSAN SAULNY, NYTimes

A study shows that second-generation Americans outperform the foreign born by many socioeconomic standards.
Document: A Portrait of the Adult Children of Immigrants

Tuesday, February 12, 2013

Gautam Mukunda: Abraham Lincoln, Avatar of History .



Big Think: Gautam Mukunda: Abraham Lincoln, Avatar of History

Political scientist and author Guatam Mukunda believes Abraham Lincoln's humility derived from his unique mind and sense of destiny.

Mukunda's latest book is "Indispensable: When Leaders Really Matter" --http://goo.gl/HGshO

Transcript -- Abraham Lincoln's humility comes from a lot of places, but it probably starts with his sense of empathy. We know a remarkable amount about him for someone who was born in the early 19th century. Even when he was a child he demonstrated extraordinary empathy and willingness to reach out to the people around him. Even to animals. And it's hard to imagine what sort of the Old West was like, but this is when everyone sort of... torturing animals for fun and for sports was a casual -- everybody did that. And we have many sort of quite reliable stories that he not only absolutely refused to participate in that but would stop other people from doing it when he saw it -- something that was sort of remarked upon as a strange characteristic from this young boy. (read more)

Monday, February 11, 2013

Before You Sign: A Private Student Loan Primer



WSJDigitalNetwork: Before You Sign: A Private Student Loan Primer


If you're thinking of cosigning a private student loan for your college bound child or grandchild, you might want to do a little homework first. WSJ's Lam Thuy Vo lays out what you need to know before you sign on the dotted line.

Sunday, February 10, 2013

UC online courses seen as inevitable

UC online courses seen as inevitable by Nanette Asimov, SFGate.vom

Within five years, students at the University of California will likely take 10 to 15 percent of their courses over the Internet, UC President Mark Yudof said Wednesday in San Francisco at a marathon discussion of online education with the regents, Gov. Jerry Brown and three rising stars in the world of classroom-free courses. (read more)

Saturday, February 9, 2013

Michigan lets community colleges issue four-year degrees, amid controversy

Evolution or Mission Creep? By Paul Fain, Inside Higher Education

Michigan gave its community colleges the legal authority to issue bachelor’s degrees last month, becoming the 21st state to do so. That figure has jumped from 11 states just eight years ago.

But the practice remains controversial despite its rapid expansion. The authorizing legislation in Michigan passed only after a bruising multiyear battle. Four-year universities in the state and their advocates are still steaming about the bill, arguing it will lead to duplication of degree programs and harm their collaboration with community colleges. (read more)

Friday, February 8, 2013

Good Teachers Linked to Test Success

Good Teachers Linked to Test Success By STEPHANIE BANCHERO, WSJ.com

A study found that effective teachers can boost the test scores of students who had struggled under low-performing instructors, marking a new salvo in the national debate over teacher performance.

Thursday, February 7, 2013

Timing Tips for the ACT and SAT

Timing Tips for the ACT and SAT By JOHN SAAVEDRA Jr., NYTimes.com

Fill in those bubbles fast, or slow down. What you need to know when the proctor says, “Go!”

Wednesday, February 6, 2013

College Degree, No Class Time Required

College Degree, No Class Time Required By CAROLINE PORTER, WSJ.com

University of Wisconsin will grant bachelor's degrees based on a person's knowledge as demonstrated in online tests, not on class time or credits, the first such offering from a public university system.

Tuesday, February 5, 2013

Student loans: The next housing bubble

Student loans: The next housing bubble BY PAUL CAMPOS, Salon.com

College students accrue hundreds of thousands in debt with little hope of paying it back. It's a cruel game

Monday, February 4, 2013

What Politicians Can Learn From High School Debater



What Politicians Can Learn From High School Debater

Members of a Texas high school debate team are working on their presentations. They are debating a call to extend the federal ban on assault weapons. "This is a long-term ban, if you see before this ban -- " "So how long will this ban have to go on? How long will we have to restrict people's rights?" Debaters use evidence and reason to question the arguments of their opponents. (read more)

Sunday, February 3, 2013

Public Universities to Offer Free Online Classes for Credit

Public Universities to Offer Free Online Classes for Credit By TAMAR LEWIN, NYTimes

In an unusual arrangement with a commercial company, the universities hope that those who pass the free courses will pay tuition to complete a degree program.

Saturday, February 2, 2013

To Raise Graduation Rate, Colleges Are Urged to Help a Changing Student Body

To Raise Graduation Rate, Colleges Are Urged to Help a Changing Student Body By TAMAR LEWIN, NYTimes

One report called for more flexibility for nontraditional students, suggesting services like midnight class meetings, online courses and easier credit transfers.
Economix Blog: Helping Degree Seekers Finish What They Start

Friday, February 1, 2013

College Admissions Biased Against Asians?: WSJ Opinion



College Admissions Biased Against Asians?: WSJ Opinion


Inside Higher Ed editor Scott Jaschik on complaints that affirmative action hurts Asian-American students. Photo: Associated Press. Published on May 31, 2012