Thursday, January 31, 2013

Next Made-in-China Boom: College Graduates

Next Made-in-China Boom: College Graduates By KEITH BRADSHER, NYTimes

China is making a huge investment in its universities, hoping to leverage its enormous population into 195 million college graduates by the end of the decade.

Wednesday, January 30, 2013

Chinese Graduates Say No Thanks to Factory Jobs

Chinese Graduates Say No Thanks to Factory Jobs By KEITH BRADSHER, NYTimes

    Millions of Chinese graduate from college every year, but they struggle to find jobs in an economy that is still dominated by blue-collar industries.

    Tuesday, January 29, 2013

    Finance Degree in California Appeals to Chinese



    Finance Degree in California Appeals to Chinese

    Drexel University in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, is more than 120 years old. In 2009, the university opened Drexel University Sacramento in California. Eleven international students were part of the first class at Drexel University Sacramento. (read more)

    Monday, January 28, 2013

    The Effects of China’s Push for Education

    The Effects of China’s Push for Education NYTimes Room for Debate

    The Chinese government is investing deeply in higher education, trying to create an educated work force to expand the economy beyond manufacturing.

    Is China becoming more of a competitive challenge to the United States, Europe and Japan through its rapid expansion of education? Will the nation’s focus on technical fields be a strength or a weakness?

    Good for China, and the Rest of the World by WANG HUIYAO, CENTER FOR CHINA AND GLOBALIZATION
    The investment in education will expand the middle class in China and will increase the consumption of goods and services from all over the world.

    China Wasn’t Trying to Take On the U.S. by ZHENG YONGNIAN, NATIONAL UNIVERSITY OF SINGAPORE
    The huge investment in higher education began as an effort to stimulate domestic demand.

    Only the Top Students Rival the West by GERARD A. POSTIGLIONE, UNIVERSITY OF HONG KONG
    The top-drawer schools are more competitive than ever, but the education system as a whole is not.

    Luring Back the Chinese Who Study Abroad by DAVID ZWEIG, HONG KONG UNIVERSITY OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY
    If China wants to bring back the best, it needs a fundamental reform of its academic and scientific institutions.

    A Long To-Do List by EDUARDO VELEZ BUSTILLO, FORMER WORLD BANK OFFICIAL
    Despite China’s need for higher education in order to transform its economy, the nation’s system still needs some improvements.

    Sunday, January 27, 2013

    Clarity and Confusion From Tuition Calculators

    Clarity and Confusion From Tuition Calculators By RICHARD PÉREZ-PEÑA, NYTimes

    How much does that college really cost? Colleges are now required to have online calculators to help answer that question, but they pose some challenges.

    Saturday, January 26, 2013

    Happy SAT!

    Ready for the Test!
    Day of the Test:
    • Wake up fifteen minutes early to focus your thoughts.
    • Eat breakfast (skip the quad latte and Red Bulll--you'll crash during the test).
    • Bring Student ID
    • Bring pencils, calculators, ear plugs, water, energy bar, etc.
    • Leave the house early.
    • Arrive early--use the spare time to encourage yourself and your friends to do your best.

    During the Test

    • Stand up and stretch!
    • Drink water.


    After the test, meet up with some friends, and celebrate. Good luck!

    Friday, January 25, 2013

    Twas the Night before the SAT


    Don't cram for the SAT!
    • Put down that box of flash cards and back away from the BLUE BOOK.
    • Follow you normal Friday Night Homework routine.
    • Pack all your SAT supplies (ex: CHARGED-UP calculator, pencils, check your transportation/ride, etc) before you go to bed.
    • Go to bed early.
    • Set you alarm to wake-up fifteen minutes early to focus your thoughts.

    Thursday, January 24, 2013

    SAT Jan 2013 Countdown: 1


    Critical Reading
    • Vocabulary: flash cards, word lists (Latin/Greek roots/prefixes/suffixes), word games--good! But the best way to acquire vocabulary is to READ.
    • Use POE (process of elimination)
    • Avoid answers that are too extreme (narrow, general, always/never, etc)


    Sentence Completion--1 Blank

    • Cover the answers.
    • Read the sentence.
    • Note trigger words (ex: conjunctions, prefixes, modifiers, negation) which change the meaning of the sentence.
    • Read the sentence again, substituting your own word in the blank.
    • Match your choice with the supplied answer choices.
    • Not sure of the meaning? Look at the root--is similar the root similar to the root of a word that you know?
    • Use POE to target the correct answer.
    • Yes, the word you don't know can be the correct choice.

    Sentence Completion--2 Blanks

    • Cover the answers.
    • Read the sentence.
    • Note trigger words (ex: conjunctions, prefixes, modifiers, negation) which change the meaning of the sentence.
    • Read the sentence again, substituting your own word in the blank.
    • Uncover the first column of words. Match them with your choice in the first blank (two answers should be retained, the other three should be dismissed).
    • Not sure of the meaning? Look at the root--is similar the root similar to the root of a word that you know?
    • Uncover the second column of words. Match them with your choice in the second blank (the target choices in the 1st blank are usually synonyms of each other; and the second blank is usually opposite of each other; OR the target choices in the 1st blank are antonyms of each other and the second blank is are synonyms).
    • Remember: there is only one correct answer!).

    Short Parassage (updated 1/25/2013)

    • Read the questions first.
    • The short passage questions are usually about the tone, main idea, or inference.
    • There is usually one dual short passage set per SAT test.
    • Each of the four questions compare/contrast both passages.
    • Draw a quick Venn Diagram to organize the info.
    •  Remember WHAT the topic is about, and the AUDIENCE.
    • Four Types of Dual Passages
      • Pro / Con (opposite positions)
      • General / Specific
      • 2 different academic disciplines (ex: literary criticism / autobiography)
      • Tone (objective / ironic)
    • Dual passages can be combination of the Four Types

    Long Passage (updated 1/25/2013)

    • Read the blurb (who? what? where? when?)
    • Skim & underline for information (Proper Nouns, Numeric infoUnusual Punctuation, Lists)
      • Proper Nouns
        • Capitalized words tell us more about Who? What? Where?
        • possessive 's tell us more about the Proper Nouns
        • compound-words are tailored-made for the passage
      • Numeric Info
        • Numbers (especially years) tell us more about When?  How much?  How many?
        • centuries: seventeenth, eighteenth, nineteenth...
        • sequence words: first, second, third, next, prior, former...
      • Definitions (unusual punctuation) signals narrative transitions/development
        •  :colons. --dashes-- , (parentheses) give us more info about the word/phrase to the left of the punctuation
        • "air-quotes" one to four words between quotations--not reported speech, but used to  "signal" non-literal meaning, ironic tome, or that the author disagrees with the term.
        • italics, underline, or exclamation point! indicates emphasis.
      • Lists 
        • List deliver concrete details about the topic
        • look for multiple commas ,,,  semicolons ;;;   question marks ??? or repeated words in a close proximity
    • Mark-up the passage as per the Questions (Beware of stealth EXCEPT and Inference Questions)
    • Read the passage critically (why? how?)
    • Answer the questions via POE
      • POE: Process of Elimination
        • note similar vocabulary between the text and answer choices
        • watch out for negation in either the question, text, or answer choices
        • use symbols \ = no (not possible), ` = maybe (possible), + = yes (probable)
        • Check out The Critical Reader: Inference Questions

    Dual Passages


    Dual Passage--Intro
    • Draw a Venn Diagram
    • Read the blurb (who? what? where? when? audience? type of text?)
    • Fill out the Venn Diagram--note "dual questions" in the union.

    Dual Passage--Passage 1

    • Skim & underline the First Passage for information (Proper Nouns, Unusual Punctuation, Lists)
    • Mark-up the passage as per the First Passage Questions (Beware of stealth EXCEPT and Inference Questions)
    • Read the passage critically (why? how?)
    • Answer First Passage questions ONLY via POE
    • Skip all Second Passage and Dual Passage Questions

    Dual Passage--Passage 2

    • Skim & underline the Second Passage for information (Proper Nouns, Unusual Punctuation, Lists)
    • Mark-up the passage as per the Second Passage Questions (Beware of stealth EXCEPT and Inference Questions)Read the passage critically (why? how?)
    • Answer Passage 2 questions ONLY via POE
    • Skip all Dual Passage Questions

    Dual Passage--Dual Passage Questions
    • Update Venn Diagram (tone +/-) (note if there is a switch in tone/argument)
    • Answer Dual Passage questions via POE
    • Finish!

    Wednesday, January 23, 2013

    SAT Jan 2013 Countdown: 2


    Essay:
    • Read the Prompt
    • Read the Quote
    • Read the Prompt again.
    • Think for 1 minute (don't write).
    • Brainstorm. Focus, focus, focus your complementary examples and connect these specific examples to BIG CONCEPTS. Organize. (2 minutes)
    • Write (20 min)
    • Intro Paragraph:
    • Thesis plus preview of your examples (Think DEVIL'S ADVOCATE--knock out objection to your thesis in your intro).
    • 3 body paragraphs. Topic sentence plus 4-7 sentences of concrete detail.
    • 2 body paragraphs is acceptable, but not advisable--write as much as you can to demonstrate the mastery of your tipic.
    • Transition between paragraphs.
    • Conclusion.
    • LAST 2 MINUTES: Fix errors and upgrade vocabulary--(replace to be/to have with stronger verbs).
    • Check out The Critical Reader: Essay Tips


    Writing Section (multiple choice)


    The Fist of No Error (see above and sidebar)
    • Subject/Verb agreement (number)
    • Tense (verb tense and aspect)
    • Pronoun (number, case, antecedent)
    • Adjective/Adverb (modifiers; infinitive/gerund)
    • Diction (correct word ex: affect/effect;phrasal verb & correct preposition)
    • Misplaced Modifiers (modifying phrases and clauses)
    • "Patterns": comparison, parallelism, list made of similar parts of speech
    • Conjunctions: coordinating, subordinating, correlative ; also relative pronoun clauses
    Also checkout:

    The Critical Reader: Complete SAT Grammar Rules or General Grammar Tips (updated 1/25/2013)

    Improving Sentences
    Improving Paragraphs
    Identifying Sentence Errors

    Tuesday, January 22, 2013

    SAT Jan 2013 Countdown: 3


    Before the Test

    Monday, January 21, 2013

    Eyes on the Prize

    Martin Luther King Jr Day is today--and every day!



    Eyes on the Prize is an award-winning 14-hour television series created Henry Hampton (1940-1998), produced by Blackside, and narrated by Julian Bond. Through contemporary interviews and historical footage, the series covers all of the major events of the civil rights movement from 1954-1985.

    For more info (and many more resources), see PBS: The American Experience--Eyes on the Prize.

    Eyes on the Prize: America's Civil Rights Years

    1/14 – "Awakenings" (1954–1956)
    • Murder of Emmett Till
    • Montgomery Bus Boycott

    2/14 – "Fighting Back" (1957–1962)
    • Central High School and the Little Rock Nine
    • James Meredith and the University of Mississippi

    3/14 – "Ain't Scared of Your Jails" (1960–1961)
    • Nashville sit-ins and boycotts
    • Freedom Riders

    4/14 – "No Easy Walk" (1961–1963)
    • Martin Luther King, Jr. and . . .
    • Albany, Georgia
    • Birmingham, Alabama
    • The March on Washington

    5/14 – "Mississippi: Is This America?" (1962–1964)
    • Medgar Evers
    • Murder of Goodman, Chaney and Schwerner
    • Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party

    6/14 – "Bridge to Freedom" (1965)
    • Voting rights movement in Selma, Alabama


    Eyes on the Prize: America at the Crossroads

    7/14 – "The Time Has Come" (1964–1966)
    • Malcolm X
    • Lowndes County Freedom Organization
    • The March Against Fear

    8/14 – "Two Societies" (1965–1968)
    • Martin Luther King and Chicago
    • Detroit Riot of 1967

    9/14 – "Power!" (1967–1968)
    • Election of Carl Stokes as Cleveland mayor
    • Birth of the Black Panther Party
    • Community control of the Ocean Hill-Brownsville school district in Brooklyn

    10/14 – "The Promised Land" (1967–1968)
    • The final years of Martin Luther King, Jr.
    • The Poor People's Campaign and Resurrection City

    11/14 – "Ain't Gonna Shuffle No More" (1964–1972)
    • Muhammad Ali
    • The movement at Howard University
    • National Black Political Convention

    12/14 – "A Nation of Law?" (1968–1971)
    • Fred Hampton and the Black Panther Party in Chicago
    • Attica Prison rebellion

    13/14 – "The Keys to the Kingdom" (1974–1980)
    • Busing and the Boston public school system
    • Maynard Jackson and the city of Atlanta
    • Allan Bakke and affirmative action

    14/14 – "Back to the Movement" (1979–1983)
    • Miami Riot of 1980 and preceding events
    • Election of Harold Washington as Chicago mayor and preceeding events
    • Overview of the movement and its effect upon the nation and the world


    Sunday, January 20, 2013

    Welcome to the Brave New World of MOOCs (Massive Open Online Courses)



    NYTimes: Welcome to the Brave New World of MOOCs (Massive Open Online Courses)


    More top colleges are offering free massive open online courses, but companies and universities still need to figure out a way to monetize them.

    Saturday, January 19, 2013

    Measuring the Success of Online Education

    Measuring the Success of Online Education By JOHN MARKOFF, NYTimes

    Massive open online courses tend to have low completion rates, but the courses offer an ideal medium for quantifying what works and what doesn’t.

    Friday, January 18, 2013

    High School Band Members Excited About Inaugural Parade



    VOAVideo: High School Band Members Excited About Inaugural Parade

    The inauguration of a president is a major occasion for most Americans. The preparations for the inauguration are detailed and extensive. And participants from all walks of society -- both military and civilian - spend a lot of time getting ready for the big day. Zheela Noori, of VOA's Afghan Service, tells us about a group of young people who are excited at the prospect of being involved

    Thursday, January 17, 2013

    The Brain Trainers

    The Brain Trainers By DAN HURLEY, NYTimes

    IN the back room of a suburban storefront previously occupied by a yoga studio, Nick Vecchiarello, a 16-year-old from Glen Ridge, N.J., sits at a desk across from Kathryn Duch, a recent college graduate who wears a black shirt emblazoned with the words “Brain Trainer.” Spread out on the desk are a dozen playing cards showing symbols of varying colors, shapes and sizes. Nick stares down, searching for three cards whose symbols match. (read more)

    Wednesday, January 16, 2013

    Colleges Push Back Early-Admission Deadlines

    Colleges Push Back Early-Admission Deadlines WSJ.com

    Numerous universities, including Harvard, Yale and Stanford, have pushed back deadlines for early applications to accommodate students affected by the storm.

    Tuesday, January 15, 2013

    American Documents the Country’s First Exchange Students from China

    VOANews: American Documents the Country’s First Exchange Students from China

    Many thousands of Chinese are studying at schools in the United States. And writer Liel Leibovitz says the students are following an example that began in the eighteen seventies. (read more)

    Monday, January 14, 2013

    Online Courses Look for a Business Model

    Online Courses Look for a Business Model WSJ.com

    Massive open online courses—dubbed MOOCs—have lured venture investors and universities, who have put millions of dollars into companies that partner with schools or instructors to offer free courses.
    Educators Debate Academic Merits

    Sunday, January 13, 2013

    Touring Colleges, Without Ever Leaving Home

    VOANews: Touring Colleges, Without Ever Leaving Home

    Students who want an easy way to get information about a large number of colleges in the United States can visit a website like CampusTours.com. It brings together virtual campus tours and interactive maps of more than twelve hundred colleges and universities. The site plans to add an international database for schools in other countries. (read more)

    Saturday, January 12, 2013

    Digital Natives and Their Customs

    Digital Natives and Their Customs--Interview by TAMAR LEWIN, NYTimes

    Arthur Levine takes a scholarly look at today’s college students.

    Friday, January 11, 2013

    Major Decisions

    Major Decisions By CECILIA CAPUZZI SIMON, NYTimes

    So many choices (1,500!), so few years (4!). With colleges adding new fields of study, picking a major has become harder than ever. How to decide?

    Thursday, January 10, 2013

    Tips From a Professional Cheat

    Tips From a Professional Cheat By ABBY ELLIN, NYTimes

    Six steps to writing a term paper, from someone who should know.

    Wednesday, January 9, 2013

    Puppy Love Can Cost You

    Puppy Love Can Cost You By PHYLLIS KORKKI

    Anyone thinking of vet school should consider the financial strain as well as the job satisfaction. Average debt: $125,000.

    Tuesday, January 8, 2013

    Regrets of an Accomplished Child

    Regrets of an Accomplished Child By PAMELA PAUL, NYTimes

    I was the bare-minimum student, checking off “to do” boxes, and the plan worked. I didn’t learn much of anything.

    Monday, January 7, 2013

    I.Q. Rising

    I.Q. Rising By PATRICIA COHEN, NYTimes

    James R. Flynn has spent more than 25 years trying to explain why each generation has significantly higher I.Q. scores than the previous one.

    Sunday, January 6, 2013

    The American Way of Learning

    The American Way of Learning NYTimes, Room for Debate
    Should education standards and funding be uniform across the U.S., or should they vary by state?

    Saturday, January 5, 2013

    The Year of the MOOC

    The Year of the MOOC By LAURA PAPPANO, NYTimes

    Massive open online courses are the educational happening of the moment. Everyone wants in. No one is quite sure what they’re getting into.

    Friday, January 4, 2013

    Affirmative Action: A Complicated Issue for Asian-Americans

    Affirmative Action: A Complicated Issue for Asian-Americans By ETHAN BRONNER, NYTimes

    A COLLEGE education aims to guide students through unfamiliar territory — Arabic, Dante, organic chemistry — so what was once alien comes to feel a lot less so. But sometimes an issue starts so close to home that the educational goal is the inverse: to take what students think of as familiar and place it in a new and surprising light. (read more)

    Thursday, January 3, 2013

    Elite Boarding Schools Spreading Through Asia

    Elite Boarding Schools Spreading Through Asia By KRISTIANO ANG and YENNI KWOK, NYTimes

    The schools are tapping into the demands of Asian parents who want their children to get a high-quality foreign-style education while staying close to home.

    Wednesday, January 2, 2013

    Diploma Divide--The Increasing Influence of Class in the Classroom



    NYTimes: Diploma Divide: The Increasing Influence of Class in the Classroom

    Angelica Gonzales graduated at the top of her high school class and headed off to one of the nation's top universities. Four years later she is back home, without a degree.

    READ: For Poor, Leap to College Often Ends in a Hard Fall By JASON DePARLE, NYTimes

    The story of three friends from Galveston, Tex., seems less a tribute to upward mobility than a study of obstacles in an age of economic inequality.

    Graphic: Affluent Students Have an Advantage and the Gap Is Widening

    Tuesday, January 1, 2013

    N.Y.U. and Other Medical Schools Offer Shorter Course in Training, for Less Tuition

    N.Y.U. and Other Medical Schools Offer Shorter Course in Training, for Less Tuition
    By ANEMONA HARTOCOLLIS, NYTimes

    Administrators say students can finish in three years, instead of four, without compromise to their training.