Saturday, October 6, 2012

Happy SAT!

Ready for the Test!
Day of the Test:
  • Wake up fifteen minutes early to focus your thoughts.
  • Eat breakfast (skip the quad latte and Red Bulll--you'll crash during the test).
  • Bring Student ID
  • Bring pencils, calculators, ear plugs, water, energy bar, etc.
  • Leave the house early.
  • Arrive early--use the spare time to encourage yourself and your friends to do your best.

During the Test

  • Stand up and stretch!
  • Drink water.


After the test, meet up with some friends, and celebrate. Good luck!

Friday, October 5, 2012

Twas the Night before the SAT


Don't cram for the SAT!
  • Put down that box of flash cards and back away from the BLUE BOOK.
  • Follow you normal Friday Night Homework routine.
  • Pack all your SAT supplies (ex: CHARGED-UP calculator, pencils, check your transportation/ride, etc) before you go to bed.
  • Go to bed early.
  • Set you alarm to wake-up fifteen minutes early to focus your thoughts.

Thursday, October 4, 2012

SAT Oct 2012 Countdown: 1


Critical Reading
  • Vocabulary: flash cards, word lists (Latin/Greek roots/prefixes/suffixes), word games--good! But the best way to acquire vocabulary is to READ.

  • Use POE (process of elimination)
  • Avoid answers that are too extreme (narrow, general, always/never, etc)


Sentence Completion--1 Blank

  • Cover the answers.
  • Read the sentence.
  • Note trigger words (ex: conjunctions, prefixes, modifiers, negation) which change the meaning of the sentence.
  • Read the sentence again, substituting your own word in the blank.
  • Match your choice with the supplied answer choices.
  • Not sure of the meaning? Look at the root--is similar the root similar to the root of a word that you know?
  • Use POE to target the correct answer.
  • Yes, the word you don't know can be the correct choice.

Sentence Completion--2 Blanks

  • Cover the answers.
  • Read the sentence.
  • Note trigger words (ex: conjunctions, prefixes, modifiers, negation) which change the meaning of the sentence.
  • Read the sentence again, substituting your own word in the blank.
  • Uncover the first column of words. Match them with your choice in the first blank (two answers should be retained, the other three should be dismissed).
  • Not sure of the meaning? Look at the root--is similar the root similar to the root of a word that you know?
  • Uncover the second column of words. Match them with your choice in the second blank (the target choices in the 1st blank are usually synonyms of each other; and the second blank is usually opposite of each other; OR the target choices in the 1st blank are antonyms of each other and the second blank is are synonyms).
  • Remember: there is only one correct answer!).

Short Parassage

  • Read the questions first.
  • The short passage questions are usually about the tone, main idea, or inference.
  • There is usually one dual short passage set per SAT test.
  • Each of the four questions compare/contrast both passages.
  • Draw a quick Venn Diagram to organize the info.
  • The dual passages may not contradict each other (i.e. +/-), but one passage may be general, and the other passage may be more specific. Remember WHAT the topic is about, and the AUDIENCE.

Long Passage

  • Read the blurb (who? what? where? when?)
  • Skim & underline for information (Proper Nouns, Unusual Punctuation, Lists)
  • Mark-up the passage as per the Questions (Beware of stealth EXCEPT and Inference Questions)
  • Read the passage critically (why? how?)
  • Answer the questions via POE

Dual Passages


Dual Passage--Intro

  • Draw a Venn Diagram
  • Read the blurb (who? what? where? when? audience? type of text?)
  • Fill out the Venn Diagram--note "dual questions" in the union.

Dual Passage--Passage 1

  • Skim & underline the First Passage for information (Proper Nouns, Unusual Punctuation, Lists)
  • Mark-up the passage as per the First Passage Questions (Beware of stealth EXCEPT and Inference Questions)
  • Read the passage critically (why? how?)
  • Answer First Passage questions ONLY via POE
  • Skip all Second Passage and Dual Passage Questions

Dual Passage--Passage 2

  • Skim & underline the Second Passage for information (Proper Nouns, Unusual Punctuation, Lists)
  • Mark-up the passage as per the Second Passage Questions (Beware of stealth EXCEPT and Inference Questions)Read the passage critically (why? how?)
  • Answer Passage 2 questions ONLY via POE
  • Skip all Dual Passage Questions

Dual Passage--Dual Passage Questions

  • Update Venn Diagram (tone +/-) (note if there is a switch in tone/argument)
  • Answer Dual Passage questions via POE
  • Finish!

Wednesday, October 3, 2012

SAT Oct 2012 Countdown: 2


Essay:

  • Read the Prompt
  • Read the Quote
  • Read the Prompt again.
  • Think for 1 minute (don't write).
  • Brainstorm. Focus, focus, focus your complementary examples and connect these specific examples to BIG CONCEPTS. Organize. (2 minutes)
  • Write (20 min)
  • Intro Paragraph:
  • Thesis plus preview of your examples (Think DEVIL'S ADVOCATE--knock out objection to your thesis in your intro).
  • 3 body paragraphs. Topic sentence plus 4-7 sentences of concrete detail.
  • 2 body paragraphs is acceptable, but not advisable--write as much as you can to demonstrate the mastery of your tipic.
  • Transition between paragraphs.
  • Conclusion.
  • LAST 2 MINUTES: Fix errors and upgrade vocabulary--(replace to be/to have with stronger verbs).


Writing Section (multiple choice)


The Fist of No Error (see above and sidebar)

  • Subject/Verb agreement (number)
  • Tense (verb tense and aspect)
  • Pronoun (number, case, antecedent)
  • Adjective/Adverb (modifiers; infinitive/gerund)
  • Diction (correct word ex: affect/effect;phrasal verb & correct prepostition)
  • Misplaced Modifiers (modifying phrases and clauses)
  • "Patterns": comparison, parallelism, list made of similar parts of speech
  • Conjunctions: coordinating, subordinating, correlative ; also relative pronoun clauses

Improving Sentences

Improving Paragraphs

Identifying Sentence Errors

Tuesday, October 2, 2012

SAT Oct 2012 Countdown: 3


Before the Test
  • Check out CollegeBoard's Practice page.
  • Gather all your completed SAT Practice Tests into ONE pile.
  • Arrange the tests from oldest to the most recent test taken (so you can track your progress)
  • Review a completed test every evening before the Night Before the SAT Test (20-45 min).
  • Look-up any difficult vocabulary.
  • Note the trigger words in the Sentence completion Questions.
  • Note how you used POE (Process of Elimination) to get the right answers in the short, long, dual passage sections.
  • Analyze your wrong answers, and adjust your POE (ex. did you consistently choose the 2nd best choice on inference or EXCEPT questions).
  • Review the FIST OF NO ERROR for the Writing section and mentally check off the selections (S/V, Tense, Prononous, Adj/Adv, Diction, Misplaced Metaphors, Parallelism, Conjunctions) as you review the wrong answers.
  • Compare the errors made in the Paragraph Improvement section and your own essay: Transtions? Sentences out of sequence? Too much/too little concrete detail? Delete extraneous info? etc, etc, etc...
  • Add Image
  • Re-read NYTimes The Choice Blog: For Those Withholding SAT Scores, Advice on Completing the Common Application By Jacques Steinberg
  • Re-Read: To Really Learn, Quit Studying and Take a Test By PAM BELLUCK, NYTimes

Sunday, September 23, 2012

SAT Basics from SaberHacer



SaberHacer: High School - SAT Basics

Learn more at http://www.SaberHacer.com - Especialistas en ayuda financiera dan las respuestas a preguntas frecuentes. Escucha los consejos de cómo hacer para que los préstamos y becas paguen los costos de las universidades.

Wednesday, July 25, 2012

Help for the Not So Needy


Help for the Not So Needy By CHRISTOPHER DREW, NYTimes


Many colleges and universities are offering sizable amounts of merit money, aid based mainly on academic promise. Here are some of them.

Tuesday, July 24, 2012

Sadlier-Oxford Level G Units 13, 14, 15 Word Search Puzzle

Sadlier-Oxford Level G Units 13, 14, 15 Word Search Puzzle

Vocabulary words from Sadlier-Oxford Level G Units 13, 14, 15. 20 words per unit.

The 60 of 60 words appear in the puzzle.

For more info, see www.satverbalprep.net

download .doc

download .pdf

Monday, July 23, 2012

Sadlier-Oxford Level G Units 10, 11, 12 Word Search Puzzle

Sadlier-Oxford Level G Units 10, 11, 12 Word Search Puzzle

Vocabulary words from Sadlier-Oxford Level G Units 10, 11, 12. 20 words per unit.

The 60 of 60 words appear in the puzzle.

For more info, see www.satverbalprep.net

download .doc

download .pdf

Sunday, July 22, 2012

Student Presidents

“We both have degrees from Harvard,” President Obama told the White House correspondents at this year’s annual roast. “I have one, he has two.” Pause. “What a snob.” Perhaps. With Mr. Obama (law) or Mitt Romney (law and business) in the White House, every president from 1989 to at least 2017 will have had a degree from Harvard or Yale. But the presidency has not always been elitist: 11 presidents never graduated college, and in the early years many had only a few years of formal schooling. We turned to the University of Virginia’s Miller Center, whose mission is to expand understanding of the presidency, for a history lesson. ANDREA KAYDA, NYTimes
See the answers»
Sadlier-Oxford Level G Units 07, 08, 09 Word Search Puzzle

Vocabulary words from Sadlier-Oxford Level G Units 07, 08, 09. 20 words per unit.

The 60 of 60 words appear in the puzzle.

For more info, see www.satverbalprep.net

download .doc

download .pdf

Saturday, July 21, 2012

Big Data on Campus


Big Data on Campus By MARC PARRY, NYTimes

Netflix meets Google meets academia. Data mining is reshaping the college experience.

Sunday, July 8, 2012

What is a Good Teacher Worth?

What is a Good Teacher Worth? By ANDREW C. REVKIN, NYTimes

How much is a good teacher worth -- literally and figuratively?

Saturday, July 7, 2012

Honor Code

Honor Code By DAVID BROOKS, NYTimes OpEd

It’s no longer debatable that boys are lagging in school. Serving them effectively is going to require some scrambling of educational culture.

Friday, July 6, 2012

Sadlier-Oxford Level G Units 07, 08, 09 Word Search Puzzle

Sadlier-Oxford Level G Units 07, 08, 09 Word Search Puzzle

Vocabulary words from Sadlier-Oxford Level G Units 07, 08, 09. 20 words per unit.

The 60 of 60 words appear in the puzzle.

For more info, see www.satverbalprep.net

download .doc

download .pdf

Monday, July 2, 2012

Fixing College

Fixing College By JEFF SELINGO, NYTimes OP-ED

Colleges and universities must mitigate a decade’s worth of unsustainable growth by looking for ways to lower costs, embrace technology and improve education.

Sunday, July 1, 2012

The Exam: Preparing for China's College Entrance Test



The Exam: Preparing for China's College Entrance Test NYTimes

Test That Can Determine the Course of Life in China Gets a Closer Examination
By EDWARD WONG, NYTimes
Debate appears to have grown more heated over the value of the gaokao, the test at the end of high school that is believed to set the course of one’s life.

Friday, June 29, 2012

Sadlier-Oxford Level G Units 04, 05, 06 Word Search Puzzle

Sadlier-Oxford Level G Units 04, 05, 06 Word Search Puzzle

Vocabulary words from Sadlier-Oxford Level G Units 04, 05, 06. 20 words per unit.

60 words appear in the puzzle.


Download the .doc


Download the .pdf

Tuesday, June 26, 2012

Pre-Med’s New Priorities: Heart and Soul and Social Science

Pre-Med’s New Priorities: Heart and Soul and Social Science by By ELISABETH ROSENTHAL, NYTimes

Can the MCAT identify that ethereal mix of scientist, humanist and spiritualist that makes a good doctor?

Monday, June 25, 2012

The College Graduate as Collateral

The College Graduate as Collateral By LUIGI ZINGALES, NYTimes Investors could finance students’ education with equity, not debt. In exchange, investors would receive a fraction of students’ future income.

Sunday, June 24, 2012

Those 857 Desks? A Message for the Candidates

Those 857 Desks? A Message for the Candidates By ADESHINA EMMANUEL by NYTimes

 The College Board has put 857 desks on the National Mall in Washington to represent the 857 high school students who drop out every hour of every school day.

Saturday, June 23, 2012

Tipping Point Reading Guide

Tipping Point Reading Guide (look on the right side of the page for each chapter)

Friday, June 22, 2012

Sadlier-Oxford Level G Units 01, 02, 03

Sadlier-Oxford Level G Units 01, 02, 03 Word Search Puzzle

Vocabulary words from Sadlier-Oxford Level G Units 01, 02, 03. 20 words per unit.

The 59 of 60 words appear in the puzzle. (**Reconnaissance not included)

Download .doc
Download .pdf

Thursday, June 21, 2012

MUST READ: Malcolm Gladwell

Teacher Jennifer's comment: Although I don't agree with every word he writes, Malcolm Gladwell is one of my favorite essayists. My SAT CR/Wr prep and American Literature classes are currently studying Gladwell's article Examined LifeWhat Stanley H. Kaplan taught us about the SAT. Here are some more links for further reading.



TED: Malcolm Gladwell: What we can learn from spaghetti sauce

http://www.ted.com Tipping Point author Malcolm Gladwell gets inside the food industry's pursuit of the perfect spaghetti sauce -- and makes a larger argument about the nature of choice and happiness.

MUST READ: Examined LifeWhat Stanley H. Kaplan taught us about the SAT
  • Note: Gladwell's article was published 2001. March 2005, CollegeBoard addressed some of the UC system's concerns by re-organizing the test, deleting the analogy section and incorporating the Essay section. But Gladwell's conclusion that dilligent study and parental participation makes the "difference' remains valid.
An exerpt from Chapter Two of The Tipping Point: Are you a connector?
  • The central role that three personality types--that I call Connectors, Mavens, and Salesmen-- play in social epidemics. In this excerpt, Gladwell describes a simple test that anyone can take to tell whether they fall into the first of those categories, the Connector.
An exerpt from the Intro of Blink: The Second Mind
An excerpt from Chapter Eight of Outliers: Rice Paddies and Math Tests
  • "No one who can rise before dawn three hundred and sixty days a year fails to make his family rich."

Monday, June 11, 2012

The Algorithm Didn’t Like My Essay

The Algorithm Didn’t Like My Essay By RANDALL STROSS, NYTimes
 Sophisticated software holds promise for making the grading of student essays more efficient — and it wouldn’t entirely replace human teachers.

Sunday, June 10, 2012

Risky Rise of the Good-Grade Pill

Risky Rise of the Good-Grade Pill By ALAN SCHWARZ, NYTimes At high schools across the United States, pressure over grades and competition for college admissions are encouraging students to abuse stimulants. In Their Own Words: 'Study Drugs'

Thursday, April 26, 2012

Girls in STEM: A New Generation of Women in Science



wh.gov: Girls in STEM: A New Generation of Women in Science

Girls in STEM, featuring young women scientists and engineers who wowed the President and the nation at the White House Science Fair in February, shines a spotlight on these extraordinary young role models and their exciting projects -- ranging from a machine that detects buried landmines, to a prosthetic hand device, to a lunchbox that uses UV light to kill bacteria on food. http://www.whitehouse.gov/stem

Check out Angela Zhang of Monta Vista High School, Cupertino, CA 00:58-01:33

Student Loan Interest Rates Loom as Political Battle

Student Loan Interest Rates Loom as Political Battle By TAMAR LEWIN, NYTimes
President Obama is pushing to retain a low interest rate for student loans, but Republicans counter that such a move is a fiscally irresponsible attempt to buy the youth vote.

Wednesday, April 25, 2012

Should teachers and students be Facebook friends?

Should teachers and students be Facebook friends? By Karen Matthews, Associated Press

NEW YORK -- Should students and teachers ever be friends on Facebook? School districts across the country, including the nation's largest, are weighing that question as they seek to balance the risks of inappropriate contact with the academic benefits of social networking.

Tuesday, April 24, 2012

Whose Offer Is Sweetest?

Whose Offer Is Sweetest? By TANYA CALDWELL, NYTimes

Expert advice on comparing financial aid award letters.

Monday, April 23, 2012

When the Calculator Says 1 + 1 = 4

When the Calculator Says 1 + 1 = 4 By MATT FLEGENHEIMER, NYTimes

The new “net price calculators” are supposed to tell you what college will really cost. But like all things in their infancy, there are growing pains.

Sunday, April 22, 2012

A Second Opinion: The Post-Baccalaureate


A Second Opinion: The Post-Baccalaureate

For older students, post-bac programs can resuscitate, or initiate, dreams of practicing medicine. But medical training is a long, risky journey.

Saturday, April 21, 2012

Friday, April 20, 2012

Nonfiction Curriculum Enhanced Reading Skills in New York City Schools

Nonfiction Curriculum Enhanced Reading Skills in New York City Schools

According to a new study, children in New York City schools who learned to read using an experimental curriculum that emphasized nonfiction texts outperformed those at other schools.

Thursday, April 19, 2012

UC grows more selective as applications flood in

UC grows more selective as applications flood in by Matt Krupnick, Contra Costa Times and SanJoseMercury.com

Admissions fall to 66 percent of applicants statewide, although record number of California residents get in.

Document: UC admissions for Fall 2012 (preliminary data, April 2012)

Wednesday, April 18, 2012

High School, in Three Years

High School, in Three Years
wsj.com
More high school students are graduating in three years. Fueling the trend are state scholarships, the growth in online classes and the use of proficiency testing to earn credits.

Tuesday, April 17, 2012

Ignoring College Rankings to Find My No. 1 School

Ignoring College Rankings to Find My No. 1 School
NYTimes, The Choice Blog

Eric Eichelberger, a senior at Marist School in Atlanta, says "the best school for me is not necessarily the one with the highest rankings."

Monday, April 16, 2012

How to Compare Financial Aid Award Letters

How to Compare Financial Aid Award Letters
NYTimes The Choice Blog
Two experts, Zac Bissonnette and Kalman A. Chany, offer advice on comparing award letters.

Sunday, April 15, 2012

Trying to Find a Measure for How Well Colleges Do

Trying to Find a Measure for How Well Colleges Do
By RICHARD PÉREZ-PEÑA, NYTimes.com

What information exists on how well colleges teach their students has often been hidden from view. But that may be changing — including with the use of standardized tests.

Saturday, March 10, 2012

Happy SAT!

Ready for the Test!
Day of the Test:
  • Wake up fifteen minutes early to focus your thoughts.
  • Eat breakfast (skip the quad latte and Red Bulll--you'll crash during the test).
  • Bring Student ID
  • Bring pencils, calculators, ear plugs, water, energy bar, etc.
  • Leave the house early.
  • Arrive early--use the spare time to encourage yourself and your friends to do your best.

During the Test

  • Stand up and stretch!
  • Drink water.


After the test, meet up with some friends, and celebrate. Good luck!

Friday, March 9, 2012

Twas the Night before the SAT


Don't cram for the SAT!
  • Put down that box of flash cards and back away from the BLUE BOOK.
  • Follow you normal Friday Night Homework routine.
  • Pack all your SAT supplies (ex: CHARGED-UP calculator, pencils, check your transportation/ride, etc) before you go to bed.
  • Go to bed early.
  • Set you alarm to wake-up fifteen minutes early to focus your thoughts.

Thursday, March 8, 2012

SAT March 2012 Countdown: 1


Critical Reading
  • Vocabulary: flash cards, word lists (Latin/Greek roots/prefixes/suffixes), word games--good! But the best way to acquire vocabulary is to READ.

  • Use POE (process of elimination)
  • Avoid answers that are too extreme (narrow, general, always/never, etc)


Sentence Completion--1 Blank

  • Cover the answers.
  • Read the sentence.
  • Note trigger words (ex: conjunctions, prefixes, modifiers, negation) which change the meaning of the sentence.
  • Read the sentence again, substituting your own word in the blank.
  • Match your choice with the supplied answer choices.
  • Not sure of the meaning? Look at the root--is similar the root similar to the root of a word that you know?
  • Use POE to target the correct answer.
  • Yes, the word you don't know can be the correct choice.

Sentence Completion--2 Blanks

  • Cover the answers.
  • Read the sentence.
  • Note trigger words (ex: conjunctions, prefixes, modifiers, negation) which change the meaning of the sentence.
  • Read the sentence again, substituting your own word in the blank.
  • Uncover the first column of words. Match them with your choice in the first blank (two answers should be retained, the other three should be dismissed).
  • Not sure of the meaning? Look at the root--is similar the root similar to the root of a word that you know?
  • Uncover the second column of words. Match them with your choice in the second blank (the target choices in the 1st blank are usually synonyms of each other; and the second blank is usually opposite of each other; OR the target choices in the 1st blank are antonyms of each other and the second blank is are synonyms).
  • Remember: there is only one correct answer!).

Short Parassage

  • Read the questions first.
  • The short passage questions are usually about the tone, main idea, or inference.
  • There is usually one dual short passage set per SAT test.
  • Each of the four questions compare/contrast both passages.
  • Draw a quick Venn Diagram to organize the info.
  • The dual passages may not contradict each other (i.e. +/-), but one passage may be general, and the other passage may be more specific. Remember WHAT the topic is about, and the AUDIENCE.

Long Passage

  • Read the blurb (who? what? where? when?)
  • Skim & underline for information (Proper Nouns, Unusual Punctuation, Lists)
  • Mark-up the passage as per the Questions (Beware of stealth EXCEPT and Inference Questions)
  • Read the passage critically (why? how?)
  • Answer the questions via POE

Dual Passages


Dual Passage--Intro

  • Draw a Venn Diagram
  • Read the blurb (who? what? where? when? audience? type of text?)
  • Fill out the Venn Diagram--note "dual questions" in the union.

Dual Passage--Passage 1

  • Skim & underline the First Passage for information (Proper Nouns, Unusual Punctuation, Lists)
  • Mark-up the passage as per the First Passage Questions (Beware of stealth EXCEPT and Inference Questions)
  • Read the passage critically (why? how?)
  • Answer First Passage questions ONLY via POE
  • Skip all Second Passage and Dual Passage Questions

Dual Passage--Passage 2

  • Skim & underline the Second Passage for information (Proper Nouns, Unusual Punctuation, Lists)
  • Mark-up the passage as per the Second Passage Questions (Beware of stealth EXCEPT and Inference Questions)Read the passage critically (why? how?)
  • Answer Passage 2 questions ONLY via POE
  • Skip all Dual Passage Questions

Dual Passage--Dual Passage Questions

  • Update Venn Diagram (tone +/-) (note if there is a switch in tone/argument)
  • Answer Dual Passage questions via POE
  • Finish!

Wednesday, March 7, 2012

SAT March 2012 Countdown: 2


Essay:

  • Read the Prompt
  • Read the Quote
  • Read the Prompt again.
  • Think for 1 minute (don't write).
  • Brainstorm. Focus, focus, focus your complementary examples and connect these specific examples to BIG CONCEPTS. Organize. (2 minutes)
  • Write (20 min)
  • Intro Paragraph:
  • Thesis plus preview of your examples (Think DEVIL'S ADVOCATE--knock out objection to your thesis in your intro).
  • 3 body paragraphs. Topic sentence plus 4-7 sentences of concrete detail.
  • 2 body paragraphs is acceptable, but not advisable--write as much as you can to demonstrate the mastery of your tipic.
  • Transition between paragraphs.
  • Conclusion.
  • LAST 2 MINUTES: Fix errors and upgrade vocabulary--(replace to be/to have with stronger verbs).


Writing Section (multiple choice)


The Fist of No Error (see above and sidebar)

  • Subject/Verb agreement (number)
  • Tense (verb tense and aspect)
  • Pronoun (number, case, antecedent)
  • Adjective/Adverb (modifiers; infinitive/gerund)
  • Diction (correct word ex: affect/effect;phrasal verb & correct prepostition)
  • Misplaced Modifiers (modifying phrases and clauses)
  • "Patterns": comparison, parallelism, list made of similar parts of speech
  • Conjunctions: coordinating, subordinating, correlative ; also relative pronoun clauses

Improving Sentences

Improving Paragraphs

Identifying Sentence Errors

Tuesday, March 6, 2012

SAT March 2012 Countdown: 3


Before the Test
  • Check out CollegeBoard's Practice page.
  • Gather all your completed SAT Practice Tests into ONE pile.
  • Arrange the tests from oldest to the most recent test taken (so you can track your progress)
  • Review a completed test every evening before the Night Before the SAT Test (20-45 min).
  • Look-up any difficult vocabulary.
  • Note the trigger words in the Sentence completion Questions.
  • Note how you used POE (Process of Elimination) to get the right answers in the short, long, dual passage sections.
  • Analyze your wrong answers, and adjust your POE (ex. did you consistently choose the 2nd best choice on inference or EXCEPT questions).
  • Review the FIST OF NO ERROR for the Writing section and mentally check off the selections (S/V, Tense, Prononous, Adj/Adv, Diction, Misplaced Metaphors, Parallelism, Conjunctions) as you review the wrong answers.
  • Compare the errors made in the Paragraph Improvement section and your own essay: Transtions? Sentences out of sequence? Too much/too little concrete detail? Delete extraneous info? etc, etc, etc...
  • Add Image
  • Re-read NYTimes The Choice Blog: For Those Withholding SAT Scores, Advice on Completing the Common Application By Jacques Steinberg
  • Re-Read: To Really Learn, Quit Studying and Take a Test By PAM BELLUCK, NYTimes

Monday, January 16, 2012

Making College More Affordable



Making College More Affordable

Vice President Joe Biden and Secretary of Education Arne Duncan are traveling the country hosting conversations nationwide addressing the cost of college tuition and student debt on American families. http://whitehouse.gov